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Boost Your Negotiation Skills and Sit at the Bargaining Table

The recent Misnk II agreement is an example of sucessful international diplomacy. Image: Wikipedia.

The recent Misnk II agreement is an example of sucessful international diplomacy. Image: Wikipedia.

Sign up for the ‘How to Bargain in Global Politics?’ Stand Alone Module starting in January and get a taste of the applied side of the International Relations Online blended learning program.

News from Dec 16, 2015

While a couple of decades ago international negotiations focused on traditional notions of international diplomacy including mainly diplomats representing their corresponding state, the situation has gradually changed with the advancing globalization and the emergence of new actors at different political levels. Negotiations thus encompasses a wide array of relevant veto players whose considerations regarding the given conflict situation should be taken into account. The challenges of rising political complexities have not made the diplomatic profession irrelevant. On the contrary, the role of diplomats remains one of paramount importance and negotiation remains at the core of diplomacy.

Despite the changing nature of the international system, politics will always be a matter of negotiation. “Who gets what and how much?” are questions on the top of the agenda with regard not only to scarce material resources but also to power, sovereignty or autonomy. The Center for Global Politics provides you with the great opportunity to get ready to step into the shoes of diplomats and international civil servants at the negotiation table. Within the twelve-week long course “How to Bargain in Global Politics?” you will get acquainted with the theoretical and practical foundations of international negotiations. The theoretical and simulation parts are supervised by the political scientists Björn Warkalla and Simon Raiser from Planpolitik.

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